Importance Of Film Studies And Journalism

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Importance Of Film Studies And Journalism



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Cinema and Media Studies - Overview

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Political accounts, investigations which have transformed lives, human interest stories, arts reviews, in-depth profiles, cartoons, speculative columns, hot gossip, sports, fashion, celebrity… and now, for something completely different! What does it all mean and why do we produce and consume it? Working together, individually and in small groups, students explore major events and stories, past and present.

They develop skills of presentation and analysis, learning when to use academic writing and when the more vivid narrative of journalism can play an equally effective role. In addition, they will explore critically and practically, the techniques used in writing and broadcasting of the past so that they can better develop their own professional capacities in the future. Discussion, presentations, research, screenings and visits will all play a part in the development of critical thinking skills, which will be workshop-based. The module will be assessed by three essays and contributions to an online journal, which is moderated by tutors at the end of the year.

Through lecture and practical engagement students will also reach a greater understanding of a number of theories and histories relating to the creative uses of image and sound. This module introduces students to the practical and analytical skills including looking at ethical problems involved in professional news writing, newsgathering, collaborating in teams to produce stories, evaluating sources and revising writing. Students will be required to produce news copy in professional formats, which will include online posts using images, video and audio and the use of mobile technology.

They will research and write a series of news articles and publish them to the class. They will learn newsgathering skills: analysis of reports, press releases and user-generated content; deducing news content from press conferences and announcements diary items ; following up human interest via face-to-face and phone interviews, including vox pops and the death knock; organising a team response to a major event; follow-up stories and case studies; analysing facts and figures to use in sidebar boxes; cultivating contacts and FoI. They will study contemporary news coverage to develop an understanding of how news stories are reported and created. They will discuss ethical, legal and commercial constraints on journalists and how different genres serve different markets.

Accuracy, subediting, headlines and search engine optimisation will be important, as will developing stories through new media, images, audio, and video. This to include links to Youtube, soundcloud etc, with multimedia elements. The module will be assessed by two portfolios, using mixed media, and a timed class exercise. This module will enable students to explore a range of film and television moving image texts through practical exercises, experimentation, observation, analysis and documentation. Students will also engage with a range of aspects of television production, from producing and directing to technical roles, providing an opportunity to gain useful transferrable skills for employability within the broadcast television and film sectors.

This practice-led work will be underpinned by a carefully critical approach to television conventions and analyses of television product in order to extend students' theoretical knowledge and understanding of the television industry. Students will be encouraged to work as self-motivated reflective practitioners, operating effectively within a team to produce a television programme. This module covers what student journalists need to know about how Britain works and the place of journalism within debates about ethics and the legal system. It is core for all journalism-related courses as everyone in the media needs to know how the system works. Classes will look at the ethical and judicial frameworks and constraints which control the reporting of legal matters, including crime and its contexts.

Students will explore these subjects from the industry viewpoint, learning how to find and develop stories within the social and political landscape of Britain today. Within public administration, classes will survey: national systems of government and representation; local government; citizen remedies and freedom of information; foreign policy, the EU and defence; social services and education; health; the judicial system civil and human rights; emergency services; the criminal justice system, including police; finance and the stock exchange.

At the heart of this course is the study of ethics. How journalists ought to behave — and what we can learn from those who do not behave properly — is particularly important to the profession. The public relies on the profession to give information. How should journalists get that information and how convey it? Ethics gives a deeper meaning to the study of the legal system for journalists. Analysis of current cases and case law will be as important as knowledge of existing frameworks and codes. The module will be assessed by two portfolios one of which includes multimedia , an essay, and an online journal moderated by tutors at the end of the year.

Continuing on from the first-year core Reporting Skills, students in Advanced Reporting will develop the skills and techniques necessary to succeed in more advanced forms of reporting, including investigative journalism, features, and in-depth interviews and profiles. This course is core for journalism students and for some allied courses. Through a combination of workshops, masterclasses and site visits, students learn to identify subject matter and potential readerships; master interviewing and editing techniques across media; learn how to find original angles; undertake focused, widely sourced research on individuals and issues; and conduct on-the-spot reportage.

They analyse statistics and develop stories based on them. They will work on projects within class with a view to publishing them online via the course website, www. The module will be assessed by two portfolios of six stories news and features in total, comprising one podcast and one video package, both of which must show evidence of professional writing and newsgathering skills learnt in this module, plus a piece of long-form journalism 2, words showcasing investigative reporting this can use multimedia. Contributions to an online journal will assess class contribution, moderated by tutors at the end of the year. This module provides opportunities for students to gain experience of the journalistic working environment and to enhance and extend their learning by applying and building on their academic and journalistic skills.

It is core for all journalism-related courses. Students must find their three —week placement themselves, deploying employability and professional skills and their own developing portfolios. These will be measured and supported by the assessments. Placements will be supported by a session of workshops, of which students must attend the majority. Assessment will be by a reflective learning log, including ethical considerations and remarks by employers; a presentation to class and on the class blog; self-assessed engagement with classes when not on placement, measured by online journal.

Students will work in teams in the newsroom to produce multi-platform journalism consistent with industry practice. This module is core for journalism students and many allied courses. Working within tight deadlines and adhering to professional codes and standards, students will write and edit copy and scripts, headlines and picture captions and learn how to use words, images, graphics, audio and social media to construct narratives appropriate to the story and platform. They will develop competencies in the use of audio and video recording and editing, making particular use of smartphones, and learn how to draw traffic to their work by means of social media. In order to perform these tasks, students will take on a number of roles specified in published job descriptions.

Students will be required to produce CVs, covering letters and portfolio websites displaying their own work, appear before an interview board and pitch story or programme ideas to commissioners. This will develop their social as well as writing skills. The second half of the course will involve four six-hour long news days, which will offer chances to transform understandings into practice. Successful completion of this module will involve the preparation of journalism and employability portfolios to be developed for presentation to prospective employers. Assessment will involve three portfolios of journalism, and an employability portfolio.

Contribution to news days will be both self-assessed and moderated by tutors. This module enables students to develop employability skills and competencies, understand the nature of work, and work toward developing a portfolio of skills and competencies to facilitate the transition into graduate level employment. The module combines a series of taught classes combined with practical work-based learning opportunities i.

Appropriate work-based learning opportunities and projects will be advertised by week 5 although it will also be possible for students to engage in projects acquired in other ways with the approval of the module leader. Participation in university-advertised projects will sometimes be based on competitive applications. A series of taught classes will support progress through the module and will usually be timetabled for the first 8 weeks of it. An additional session in week 12 will encourage reflection and engagement in assessment activities. The module aims to enable students to:.

Consider their employability in relation to graduate careers goals, through the development of professional competencies and knowledge through work experience. Demonstrate theoretical concepts and transferable competencies and deploy them in a practical, problem-solving way. Gain understanding of current issues, practices and relevant legislation within a particular and relevant organisational contexts. Build personal networks, explore employment options and consider future career plans. The module will examine a variety of European, including British, films in relation to their specific cultural, historical and social contexts, considering the way in which national identity is imagined, interrogated and contested in these films.

You will explore European film through a variety of themes. This module provides a thorough overview of institutions, economics, technologies, texts, audiences and production practices, relating to television broadcasting and its contemporary online successors. Introduce students to a range of a range of debates about the role of television in everyday life. Encourage students to deploy critical methods of analysis from previous modules to television and develop these skills through examination of specific case studies.

This module aims to provide students with a rigorous understanding of the history, theory and practices of documentary photography, and to enable them to develop key photographic skills pertinent to the practice of documentary photography. The module will introduce students to the history, theory and practice of contemporary documentary photography. The module is slanted towards practice, and provides an opportunity for students to develop photographic skills or enhance their existing photographic skills, as well as their understanding of documentary photography. The module will provide practical tuition in the skills of street photography, portraiture, photographing objects in motion, and narrative photography, and will encourage and support students in the conception and development of their own documentary photographic projects.

It considers the role of different film and television production models, and encourages students to apply what they have learned from this analysis. The module provides an insight into the role of marketing, public relations and other promotional activities in the film and television industries. It also develops the ability of the student to critically evaluate the film and television labour market, and situate their own filmmaking practice within this framework.

Alongside this critical approach, students construct an online presence as part of their professional portfolio, applying concepts and perspectives derived from the module both to examples from the wider industry and their own filmmaking practice. Students also analyse a particular professional career path as part of module. The module provides an industry and employment-oriented perspective on the field for students across Film and Television Production and Film and Television Studies, providing a counterpoint to the personal creative aspects of film and television production in studio modules, and building on the critical and analytical elements of earlier modules in L4. This module provides an opportunity to study the art and craft of screenwriting via the short film.

Screenwriting differs from other forms of creative writing because the screenplay is a vehicle for a production team to create a film. It requires a combination of visual imagination and engineering to create a good screenplay. Students need to learn the clues which enable an audience to follow the story via character creation and use of action, choice of locations, the tone, the use of genre and narrative pattern of their story. Via a mix of film analysis and writing their own script, students will have a basic grounding in this element of film production. The module explores ideas around stardom and performance, considering their significance in relation to notions of identity, cultural context, filmic narrative and audience reception. A number of case studies will be examined as the module explores shifting ideas of stardom across both eras and screen media.

In addition, students learn how the performance styles of individual stars contribute to the creation of both character and star image. This module allows students to explore in depth a topic of their own choice, arising out of previous study and subject to supervisor approval. It offers an exciting way to make an area of expertise all your own, whilst developing both journalistic and academic communication skills. It must be a piece of longform journalism, aimed at a specified audience, not a study of journalism. It can be in any journalistic medium. Independent but supported learning and sustained research and writing will provide a focus for refining and drawing together a wide range of transferable skills. These must result in a high quality piece of journalism with an academically rigorous critical and research underpinning.

A synopsis and project management schedule, demonstrating a research strategy submitted at week 8, will provide a signpost for further work. A three-hour refresher session on law will prompt attention to legal constraints. This module allows students to explore in depth a topic of their own choice, arising out of their study at levels 4 and 5 subject to supervisor approval. Students are supported in the development of the project via close supervision according to staff subject specialisms. Supervisors guide students through planning of their work and overall topic, regular tutorials and feedback on draft material. Students gain personal development skills through the assessed management of their dissertation process and reflection on feedback.

Arts Journalism investigates and teaches the specific professional techniques and practices of arts journalism — in music, film, literature, art, architecture, dance, theatre, and other areas of student interest which relate directly to employability. Throughout this week module, the arts are placed in the context of the relationship between journalist practitioners in print, radio and online and the arts industries. It is suitable for anyone wanting to explore these areas. Field trips and guest speakers will demonstrate in depth the connection between professional journalists and arts practitioners. This module also surveys the cultural, historical and global business issues and conditions within which arts journalism takes place, enabling self-reflective and critical perspectives.

Students are encouraged to publish their work inside the university website and outside, building up contacts and a portfolio of pieces. Students are assessed through a portfolio of practical and critical work, which can be across platforms, a diary of their critical reactions to arts events, and a final 1,word piece of arts journalism. Students will work in teams in the multimedia newsroom to research, write and present multi-platform journalism, specifically in video and audio formats.

Working to specified job descriptions, students will take on responsibility for the editorial and production processing and use knowledge to spot and prepare stories for forward planning diaries, with due regard to ethical and professional considerations. Student will work to tight deadlines and adhere to professional codes and standards during editorial cycles, which will periodically be explored in four newsdays and in two newsweeks. These will develop employability and focus around industry practices, including news conferences, bulletins and multimedia links.

Students will be given the opportunity to work in specific professional genres news, features, sport etc or specific media audio, video, newspaper, online. They will write, subedit and re-version copy for different platforms and purposes. They will use mobile technology and social media to enhance news values. Students will be encouraged to develop a contacts book and to publish work in professional publications, as well as on the course website. Language, writing and presentation styles will be developed to match or improve on contemporary industry practice.

Through tutor coaching they will improve skills such as video, audio and copy editing, writing and editing copy and scripts, headlines and picture captions and learn how to use words, images, graphics, audio and social media, including tweeting, to construct narratives appropriate to stories and platforms. News weeks will develop team working and technical proficiency. Student development will be informed by sessions led by guest speakers from the industry and field trips to working news environments. Assessment will involve three portfolios of journalism. Engagement with class will be self-assessed and moderated by tutors.

This module looks at the professional skills of the journalist in politics, public affairs and society. It is both theoretical and practical, offering an introduction to the world of advocacy for anyone intrested in acquiring these skills. Students will examine the historical and political contexts of journalism, the role of charities and special interest groups such as environmental and rights campaigners and how to cover lobbying and direct action. They will analyse the ethics of committed journalism and debate how to justify bias.

They will explore, through discussion, presentation and professional practice, links with PR and internal comms professionals, viral and social media, humour and satire, human interest stories and running appeals. They will produce original work for a campaign of their choice, which they must pitch to their classmates and tutor. Formative assessment will be an essay on how campaigning has changed events and whether such campaigning is justified An overview of media law and ethical considerations will underpin a summative project of campaigning journalism which will combine original research, in either a series of three short articles or one long article and a log of events and contacts.

Students will develop professional practices working in small groups to produce a short documentary. They will be required to research, pitch and develop a documentary proposal following industry guidelines and legal frameworks. The module will give an overview of the commissioning process and will include input from industry professionals. There will be an emphasis on how to film and work with documentary subjects or characters in an ethical way. Students will learn about a range of documentary modes, genres and techniques via screenings, discussion and practice. Key figures and films will be explored as well as emerging styles and formats. This module considers issues of reception and interpretation within the field of film studies from both a historical and theoretical perspective.

Using a variety of case-studies, the module explores the historical and theoretical issues that inform and structure film reception and interpretation, the interaction between text and context and the formation of film canons. This module represents core self-development activities that have been present throughout the course: career and exhibition planning, promotion of student work, and portfolio. It provides practical guidance for students in how to position themselves and their work with reference to their career goals, and builds on student work in [L5. The module will include analysis of current trends and the changing media landscape, with a focus on diversity and representation across the industry, as well as encouraging engagement with local film organisations and activities.

On this module you will develop your own research project on a topic you are passionate about. This could relate to your career aspirations, your practical work or a theoretical concept. We will teach you about research methods and ethics so that you can apply ethical research methods to your work. You can choose to write a traditional dissertation or a piece of practice-led work. Alternatively, you could produce a piece of critical media and write a short thesis to support it. With your classmates you will run a real time newsroom exactly as you would in industry.

You will manage the day yourself with support from your tutors. You will identify stories, arrange coverage and produce the content to meet legal and ethical standards across radio, TV and multimedia platforms. This is your chance to take on the role of an investigative journalist and tell the stories that matter. We have designed this module to help you prepare for graduation and entering industry. You will reflect on the experiences you have had on your degree, highlight your successes and identify any areas for development. We will help you to create an online portfolio of your journalistic work that showcases your skills to future employers.

As part of the module you will take part in CV workshops and careers events and receive 2 hours of voice and presentation coaching. The best way to learn a practical subject like media is by doing it. We deliver your modules through:. Each module has 2 to 3 hours of contact time a week. We schedule our taught sessions between am and pm, Monday to Friday. You will need to conduct independent study outside of this time. This might include reading, researching and completing your assignments.

You can also arrange academic tutorials with your module tutors throughout the year to receive feedback on your work and discuss the course content. Our teaching draws on both our research and professional experience. This means your learning is informed by the most current thinking in the subject area. You can find out more about our research and backgrounds by visiting our staff pages. Assessment types are usually based on practical coursework and vary from module to module. Some of your assessments might include:. For each assessment you will have the chance to talk to a tutor about your work before submission.

Each assessment will be marked and returned with feedback so you can improve your work. On this course you will gain the skills you need to succeed in a career as a journalist. You will develop your research, interview and reporting skills as well as your knowledge of digital media. Skills such as communication, critical analysis and an ability to work to deadlines are in high demand in a range of careers. Discover more career options on Prospects careers advice pages. Media Production MA. Our careers service, LaunchPad provides career support tailored to your ambitions. Through this service you can access:. This support doesn't end when you graduate. You can access our expert career advice for the rest of your life.

We will help you gain experience and confidence to succeed. It's your career, your way. If you are an international student you will need to show that your qualifications match our entry requirements. Information about international qualifications and entry requirements can be found on our International pages. International entry requirements. If your application is successful, you will be invited to a portfolio day. On the day, you will show your work with our tutors and share with them your passion for the subject.

If you have been out of education for 3 years or more and have a grade C GCSE in English Language or equivalent, you are eligible for our entry scheme for mature learners. It's a scheme that recognises non-traditional entry qualifications and experience for entry onto this course. Information on how to apply can be found on our dedicated page. Mature entry offer scheme. Our terms and conditions, policies and procedures contain important information about studying at York St John University.

You can read them on our Admissions page. To study for an undergraduate degree with us, you will need to pay tuition fees for your course. Tuition fees may be subject to inflation in future years. Funding Opportunities. If you choose to take a placement year, and your course offers it, you can apply for the Tuition Fee and Maintenance Loan for your placement year. How much you are awarded is based on the type of placement being undertaken and whether it is a paid or unpaid placement.

The tuition fee for your placement year will be reduced. Due to immigration laws, if you are an international student on a Student Visa, you must study full time. For more information about visa requirements and short-term study visas, please visit the International Visa and Immigration pages. International Fees and Funding. There may also be some additional costs to take into account throughout your studies, including the cost of accommodation. While studying for your degree, there may be additional costs related to your course. This may include purchasing personal equipment and stationery, books and optional field trips. For more information on tuition fee reductions and additional costs for studying abroad, please visit our study abroad pages.

For detailed information on accommodation and living costs, visit our Accommodation pages. Our Funding Advice team are here to help you with your finances throughout your degree. They offer a personal service that can help you with funding your studies and budgeting for living expenses. For advice on everything from applying for scholarships to finding additional financial support email fundingadvice yorksj. Take a practical approach to your learning. Find and tell stories that matter to you across different online and offline platforms. Become a journalist from the day you join the course. Embrace the chance to work on live projects with companies across the city. It's a way to enhance your journalistic abilities and see your work published online.

We give you access to all the equipment you need to explore your creative ideas. A newsroom, TV and radio studios, dedicated editing suits, cameras, sound equipment and more. It's all yours to master. Jamie Journalism. I had always had a passion for Journalism but when I started to research jobs in that field, I realised there was only so much I could do without a degree. York St John now feels like a second home. View all of our courses in the School of the Arts.

Back to the top. Clearing Find a course Study. Menu Search. Students Staff Accessibility. Join us through Clearing. Available in Clearing. Course overview This course gives you the knowledge, practical skills and experience to succeed as a journalist. You will focus on developing your technical abilities by creating: TV programmes Radio shows Podcasts Magazines Online content Websites.

Other opportunities to gain industry experience include: Writing for The Yorkie, our news website Getting involved with our Students' Union radio station Working with digital media agency, York Mix, to publish your stories online Working on live projects with external clients such as BBC Radio and Aesthetica magazine. Year 1 Our academic year is split into 2 semesters. In your first year, if you are a full time student, you will study: 1 compulsory module across semester 1 and 2 2 compulsory modules in semester 1 2 compulsory modules in semester 2.

If you are a part time student, the modules above will be split over 2 years. Modules Credits: Year 2 In your second year, if you are a full time student, you will study: 2 compulsory modules in semester 1 2 compulsory modules and 1 optional module in semester 2. Year 3 In your third year, if you are a full time student, you will study: 2 compulsory modules across semesters 1 and 2 2 compulsory modules in semester 1 1 compulsory module in semester 2. Teaching and learning The best way to learn a practical subject like media is by doing it. We deliver your modules through: Seminars Workshops Technical demonstrations Lectures. Assessment Assessment types are usually based on practical coursework and vary from module to module. Some of your assessments might include: Portfolios of practical work Essays Presentations 1 exam on media law.

Your future with a degree in Journalism. This degree could be the first step toward your career as a: Digital copywriter Editorial assistant Magazine features editor Newspaper journalist Press sub-editor Web content manager. You could also progress onto a postgraduate degree and take your learning even further. Whatever your ambitions, we can help you get there. Through this service you can access: Employer events LinkedIn, CV and cover letter sessions Workshops on application writing and interview skills Work experience and volunteering opportunities Personalised career advice.

Portfolio Day If your application is successful, you will be invited to a portfolio day. Mature entry offer scheme Terms and conditions Our terms and conditions, policies and procedures contain important information about studying at York St John University. You can find out more about funding your degree by visiting our funding opportunities page. Funding Opportunities Placement year funding If you choose to take a placement year, and your course offers it, you can apply for the Tuition Fee and Maintenance Loan for your placement year.

Additional costs and financial support There may also be some additional costs to take into account throughout your studies, including the cost of accommodation.

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