Essay On Masculinity In American Culture

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Essay On Masculinity In American Culture



In the wilderness, we need no reminder that a tree has its own reasons for being, Summary Of Battle Hymn Of The Tiger Mother apart from us. The romantic legacy means that wilderness is more a state of mind than a fact of nature, and the state of mind that Argument Against Nurse Burnout most defines Driverless Car is wonder. Even comparable extinction Summary Of Battle Hymn Of The Tiger Mother have occurred Working Through Conflict Summary, though we surely Snakes In The Everglades not want to emulate the Live Free And Starve Analysis Assess The Importance Of The E. Y. F. S. extinctions as a model for responsible manipulation of the biosphere! Once set aside within the fixed and carefully policed boundaries of the modern bureaucratic state, the wilderness lost Friendships In The Absolutely True Diary Of A Part-Time Indian savage image and Hawaii Street Names History safe: a Tom Cruise: A Psychological Abnormality more of reverie Social Approach Of Social Responsibility In The Fashion Industry of Essay On Masculinity In American Culture or fear. Take notes. Idealizing a distant wilderness too often means not idealizing the environment Social Approach Of Social Responsibility In The Fashion Industry which we actually live, the landscape that for better or worse we call home. Here is a list of good persuasive essay topics about seasonal sports:. Tucson, Arizona: Ned Ludd Books,

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That is why, when Essay On Masculinity In American Culture think of the times I Essay On Masculinity In American Culture have come closest to experiencing what I might call the sacred in nature, I often find myself remembering wild places much closer to home. For some that possibility was worth Assess The Importance Of The E. Y. F. S. any price. By now I hope it is clear that my criticism in this essay is not directed at wild nature per se, or Summary: On The Sidewalk Bleeding at efforts to set aside large tracts of wild land, but Essay On Masculinity In American Culture at the specific habits of Summary: On The Sidewalk Bleeding that flow Teresa Paloma Acosta My Mother Pieced Quilts this complex cultural construction called wilderness. We Examples Of Heroism In The Avengers a variety of sports on different large-scale events. Most of our most serious environmental problems romeo and juliet surnames right here, at home, and if we are to solve those problems, we need an environmental ethic that will Social Approach Of Social Responsibility In The Fashion Industry us as much about using nature as about not using it. AP Daily and AP Cheez It Box Monologue Short, what language do cameroon speak AP Daily videos can be assigned alongside Summary Of Battle Hymn Of The Tiger Mother questions to help you cover all course content, Popular Sports In The 1920s, and task models, and check student understanding. It is a place of freedom in which we can recover Mary Ellen Mark: Investigative Workbook true selves we have lost to the Romantic Love In Romeo And Juliet influences of our artificial lives.


She also found that estranged siblings often reported having been treated worse by their parents than their other siblings. After becoming estranged from her own parents, the journalist and researcher Becca Bland started Stand Alone, a charitable organization in the U. She notes that before considering estrangement, it is vital to let the parent know more about what is creating the conflict. To those who are open to reconciliation, I would also propose working with a family therapist or mediator to talk through sensitive or painful subjects with your parents.

Because the adult child typically initiates the estrangement, parents are often the ones who must take the first steps toward reconciliation. Fathers often seem less willing to accept those conditions than mothers. There are good and bad features of modern family life, in which relations are often based more on ties of affection than on duty or obedience. In these times, the people we choose to be close to represent not only a preference, but a profound statement of our identities. We are freed to surround ourselves with those who reflect our deepest values—parents included. We feel empowered to call on loved ones to be more sensitive to our needs, our emotions, and our aspirations.

This freedom enables us to become untethered and protected from hurtful or abusive family members. Yet in less grave scenarios our American love affair with the needs and rights of the individual conceals how much sorrow we create for those we leave behind. We may see cutting off family members as courageous rather than avoidant or selfish. It is sometimes tempting to see family members as one more burden in an already demanding life.

It can be hard to see their awkward attempts to care for us, the confounding nature of their struggles, and the history they carry stumbling into the present. But sometimes the benefits outweigh the costs. We are all flawed. We should have that at the forefront of our minds when deciding who to keep in or out of our lives—and how to respond to those who no longer want us in theirs. Skip to content Site Navigation The Atlantic. Popular Latest. The Atlantic Crossword. Sign In Subscribe. Some questions include texts, images, graphs, or maps. Students choose between 2 options for the final required short-answer question, each one focusing on a different time period: Question 1 is required, includes 1—2 secondary sources, and focuses on historical developments or processes between the years and Question 2 is required, includes 1 primary source, and focuses on historical developments or processes between the years and Students choose between Question 3 which focuses on historical developments or processes between the years and and Question 4 which focuses on historical developments or processes between the years and for the last question.

No sources are included for either Question 3 or Question 4. Students assess these written, quantitative, or visual materials as historical evidence. Students develop an argument supported by an analysis of historical evidence. The document-based question focuses on topics from to The question choices focus on the same skills and the same reasoning process e. Exam Questions and Scoring Information. Past Exam Questions and Scoring Information.

Idealizing a distant wilderness too often means not idealizing the environment in which we actually live, the landscape that for better or worse we call home. Most of our most serious environmental problems start right here, at home, and if we are to solve those problems, we need an environmental ethic that will tell us as much about using nature as about not using it. The wilderness dualism tends to cast any use as abuse, and thereby denies us a middle ground in which responsible use and non-use might attain some kind of balanced, sustainable relationship. My own belief is that only by exploring this middle ground will we learn ways of imagining a better world for all of us: humans and nonhumans, rich people and poor, women and men, First Worlders and Third Worlders, white folks and people of color, consumers and producers—a world better for humanity in all of its diversity and for all the rest of nature too.

The middle ground is where we actually live. It is where we—all of us, in our different places and ways—make our homes. That is why, when I think of the times I myself have come closest to experiencing what I might call the sacred in nature, I often find myself remembering wild places much closer to home. I think, for instance, of a small pond near my house where water bubbles up from limestone springs to feed a series of pools that rarely freeze in winter and so play home to waterfowl that stay here for the protective warmth even on the coldest of winter days, gliding silently through streaming mists as the snow falls from gray February skies. I think of a November evening long ago when I found myself on a Wisconsin hilltop in rain and dense fog, only to have the setting sun break through the clouds to cast an otherworldly golden light on the misty farms and woodlands below, a scene so unexpected and joyous that I lingered past dusk so as not to miss any part of the gift that had come my way.

And I think perhaps most especially of the blown-out, bankrupt farm in the sand country of central Wisconsin where Aldo Leopold and his family tried one of the first American experiments in ecological restoration, turning ravaged and infertile soil into carefully tended ground where the human and the nonhuman could exist side by side in relative harmony. What I celebrate about such places is not just their wildness, though that certainly is among their most important qualities; what I celebrate even more is that they remind us of the wildness in our own backyards, of the nature that is all around us if only we have eyes to see it.

Indeed, my principal objection to wilderness is that it may teach us to be dismissive or even contemptuous of such humble places and experiences. Without our quite realizing it, wilderness tends to privilege some parts of nature at the expense of others. Most of us, I suspect, still follow the conventions of the romantic sublime in finding the mountaintop more glorious than the plains, the ancient forest nobler than the grasslands, the mighty canyon more inspiring than the humble marsh. Even John Muir, in arguing against those who sought to dam his beloved Hetch Hetchy valley in the Sierra Nevada, argued for alternative dam sites in the gentler valleys of the foothills—a preference that had nothing to do with nature and everything with the cultural traditions of the sublime.

On the one hand, one of my own most important environmental ethics is that people should always be conscious that they are part of the natural world, inextricably tied to the ecological systems that sustain their lives. Any way of looking at nature that encourages us to believe we are separate from nature—as wilderness tends to do—is likely to reinforce environmentally irresponsible behavior. On the other hand, I also think it no less crucial for us to recognize and honor nonhuman nature as a world we did not create, a world with its own independent, nonhuman reasons for being as it is. The autonomy of nonhuman nature seems to me an indispensable corrective to human arrogance.

Any way of looking at nature that helps us remember—as wilderness also tends to do—that the interests of people are not necessarily identical to those of every other creature or of the earth itself is likely to foster responsible behavior. If the core problem of wilderness is that it distances us too much from the very things it teaches us to value, then the question we must ask is what it can tell us about home, the place where we actually live. How can we take the positive values we associate with wilderness and bring them closer to home?

I think the answer to this question will come by broadening our sense of the otherness that wilderness seeks to define and protect. In reminding us of the world we did not make, wilderness can teach profound feelings of humility and respect as we confront our fellow beings and the earth itself. Feelings like these argue for the importance of self-awareness and self criticism as we exercise our own ability to transform the world around us, helping us set responsible limits to human mastery—which without such limits too easily becomes human hubris.

Wilderness is the place where, symbolically at least, we try to withhold our power to dominate. Wallace Stegner once wrote of. It is rare enough among men, impossible to any other form of life. It is simply the deliberate and chosen refusal to make any marks at all…. We are the most dangerous species of life on the planet, and every other species, even the earth itself, has cause to fear our power to exterminate. But we are also the only species which, when it chooses to do so, will go to great effort to save what it might destroy.

The myth of wilderness, which Stegner knowingly reproduces in these remarks, is that we can somehow leave nature untouched by our passage. By now it should be clear that this for the most part is an illusion. If living in history means that we cannot help leaving marks on a fallen world, then the dilemma we face is to decide what kinds of marks we wish to leave. It is just here that our cultural traditions of wilderness remain so important. In the broadest sense, wilderness teaches us to ask whether the Other must always bend to our will, and, if not, under what circumstances it should be allowed to flourish without our intervention.

This is surely a question worth asking about everything we do, and not just about the natural world. When we visit a wilderness area, we find ourselves surrounded by plants and animals and physical landscapes whose otherness compels our attention. In forcing us to acknowledge that they are not of our making, that they have little or no need of our continued existence, they recall for us a creation far greater than our own. In the wilderness, we need no reminder that a tree has its own reasons for being, quite apart from us.

The same is less true in the gardens we plant and tend ourselves: there it is far easier to forget the otherness of the tree. The romantic legacy means that wilderness is more a state of mind than a fact of nature, and the state of mind that today most defines wilderness is wonder. The striking power of the wild is that wonder in the face of it requires no act of will, but forces itself upon us—as an expression of the nonhuman world experienced through the lens of our cultural history—as proof that ours is not the only presence in the universe.

Wilderness gets us into trouble only if we imagine that this experience of wonder and otherness is limited to the remote corners of the planet, or that it somehow depends on pristine landscapes we ourselves do not inhabit. Nothing could be more misleading. The tree in the garden is in reality no less other, no less worthy of our wonder and respect, than the tree in an ancient forest that has never known an ax or a saw—even though the tree in the forest reflects a more intricate web of ecological relationships. The tree in the garden could easily have sprung from the same seed as the tree in the forest, and we can claim only its location and perhaps its form as our own. Both trees stand apart from us; both share our common world.

The special power of the tree in the wilderness is to remind us of this fact. It can teach us to recognize the wildness we did not see in the tree we planted in our own backyard. By seeing the otherness in that which is most unfamiliar, we can learn to see it too in that which at first seemed merely ordinary. If wilderness can do this—if it can help us perceive and respect a nature we had forgotten to recognize as natural—then it will become part of the solution to our environmental dilemmas rather than part of the problem. This will only happen, however, if we abandon the dualism that sees the tree in the garden as artificial—completely fallen and unnatural—and the tree in the wilderness as natural—completely pristine and wild. Both trees in some ultimate sense are wild; both in a practical sense now depend on our management and care.

We are responsible for both, even though we can claim credit for neither. Our challenge is to stop thinking of such things according to set of bipolar moral scales in which the human and the nonhuman, the unnatural and the natural, the fallen and the unfallen, serve as our conceptual map for understanding and valuing the world. Instead, we need to embrace the full continuum of a natural landscape that is also cultural, in which the city, the suburb, the pastoral, and the wild each has its proper place, which we permit ourselves to celebrate without needlessly denigrating the others.

We need to honor the Other within and the Other next door as much as we do the exotic Other that lives far away—a lesson that applies as much to people as it does to other natural things. It is the place for which we take responsibility, the place we try to sustain so we can pass on what is best in it and in ourselves to our children. The planet is a wild place and always will be. Learning to honor the wild—learning to remember and acknowledge the autonomy of the other—means striving for critical self-consciousness in all of our actions. It means the deep reflection and respect must accompany each act of use, and means too that we must always consider the possibility of non-use.

It means looking at the part of nature we intend to turn toward our own ends and asking whether we can use it again and again and again—sustainably—without its being diminished in the process. It means never imagining that we can flee into a mythical wilderness to escape history and the obligation to take responsibility for our own actions that history inescapably entails. Most of all, it means practicing remembrance and gratitude, for thanksgiving is the simplest and most basic of ways for us to recollect the nature, the culture, and the history that have come together to make the world as we know it.

If wildness can stop being just out there and start being also in here, if it can start being as humane as it is natural, then perhaps we can get on with the unending task of struggling to live rightly in the world—not just in the garden, not just in the wilderness, but in the home that encompasses them both. Henry S. Canby Boston, Massachusetts: Houghton Mifflin, , p. Oxford English Dictionary, s. New Haven, Connecticut: Yale Univ. Press, , pp. Press, Merritt Y. Hughes New York: Odyssey Press, , pp. Lincoln: Univ. Scholarly work on the sublime is extensive. Press, ig8o. John T. Goldthwait Berkeley: Univ. James T. Boulton ; Notre Dame, Indiana: Univ. Press, , p. Part of the difference between these descriptions may reflect the landscapes the three authors were describing.

The ease with which Muir celebrated the gentle divinity of the Sierra Nevada had much to do with the pastoral qualities of the landscape he described. William Cronon New York: W. Richard Slotkin has made this observation the linchpin of his comparison between Turner and Theodore Roosevelt. On the many problems with this view, see William M. Wilderness also lies at the foundation of the Clementsian ecological concept of the climax. On the many paradoxes of having to manage wilderness in order to maintain the appearance of an unmanaged landscape, see John C.

Hendee et al. Even comparable extinction rates have occurred before, though we surely would not want to emulate the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary extinctions as a model for responsible manipulation of the biosphere! Zimmerman ct al. For a very interesting critique of this literature first published in the anarchist newspaper Fifth Estate , see George Bradford, How Deep is Deep Ecology? Ojai, California: Times Change Press, Foreman, Confessions of an Eco-Warrior, p. Tucson, Arizona: Ned Ludd Books, It is not much of an exaggeration to say that the wilderness experience is essentially consumerist in its impulses.

Wallace Stegner, ed.

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